Hello, we are Bunker. We are the handshake between humans and technology.

We are a full-service agency and strategic partner in the landscape of design and technology. We solve problems, encourage advancement, and solidify ideas—taking projects from concept to market. We design with innovation, usability, longevity, and aesthetic front of mind. We build responsively for the devices of today and tomorrow.

Our Team

We are the partnership of Mark Wyner, Nathanael Merrill, and Drew Dunn, and we work with an awesome team of six who write, design, code, film, animate, and have fun with us.

Bunker: Drew Dunn, Nathanael Merrill, Mark Wyner
Mark Wyner
Awesome at: experience design, IA, usability, interface development, scorpion catching. Working on being better at: soccer, meditation, parenting five children.
Nathanael Merrill
Awesome at: development scalability and best practices, application design and optimization. Working on being better at: cooking, drums, and spanish.
Drew Dunn
Awesome at: interface conceptualization, product campaigns, communication strategy. Working on being better at: guitar, family vacations, and winning.

Our Work

We’ve helped a lot of awesome people take their ideas from concept to market. Here’s a partial list:

Some of the projects we’ve had the pleasure of working on:

Columbia Ultimate Portal, Web Application
Columbia Ultimate
Golden Gate Ruby Conference 2014, Website
Golden Gate Ruby Conference 2014
UseMusic, Web Application
UseMusic
Prolifiq, Website
Prolifiq
Columbia Ultimate Ajility, Website
Ajility
ElectTrac, Web Application
ElectTrac
Fusings, Social Website
Fusings
Charlie Hales, Mapping Widget
Charlie Hales
Hyundai/Kia, Mobile Apps
Hyundai

Say Hello

We’ll get to high fives later, but let’s start with the word “hello.” We’d love to hear about your vision for changing the world, and how we can partner with you to make it happen. You can also challenge us to a soccer match if you’re feeling frisky.

Journal

Following are the latest of 241 posts we have published over at Tumblr. If you enjoy them we invite you to read some more.

You see that code on the screen? It’s from the latest episode of the animated TV series Archer. In this segment, the scientist in frame (Dr. Krieger) is entering a launch code into a computer to launch a nerve-gas missile. But the code isn’t random—it’s an Easter egg.
If you are a programmer you’ll recognize that number sequence as a hexadecimal code. When that hex code is decoded it becomes UUDDLRLRBA, or “up up down down left right left right B A.”
If you’re a developer who isn’t a big gamer your fun may end (for the moment). And if you’re a gamer who understands or writes some code, your fun is just beginning. That sequence of numbers is the Konami Code; a cheat code used in many Konami games.
Why is this awesome? I don’t know. Maybe because when retro-gaming illustrators pay homage to programming on television shows, it makes developers feel happy? Not Pharrell Williams “happy,” but at the very least giddy.
The illustrator who hid the egg is Mark Paterson. You can read his Reddit post about the egg and the thread in which it was discovered.

You see that code on the screen? It’s from the latest episode of the animated TV series Archer. In this segment, the scientist in frame (Dr. Krieger) is entering a launch code into a computer to launch a nerve-gas missile. But the code isn’t random—it’s an Easter egg.

If you are a programmer you’ll recognize that number sequence as a hexadecimal code. When that hex code is decoded it becomes UUDDLRLRBA, or “up up down down left right left right B A.”

If you’re a developer who isn’t a big gamer your fun may end (for the moment). And if you’re a gamer who understands or writes some code, your fun is just beginning. That sequence of numbers is the Konami Code; a cheat code used in many Konami games.

Why is this awesome? I don’t know. Maybe because when retro-gaming illustrators pay homage to programming on television shows, it makes developers feel happy? Not Pharrell Williams “happy,” but at the very least giddy.

The illustrator who hid the egg is Mark Paterson. You can read his Reddit post about the egg and the thread in which it was discovered.

What’s a blog? Is that short for beaver log?

Ben Gresh, Accounts

It’s lovely to see creative studios affording their team members unrestricted space to explore and invent. It fosters growth in creativity, stimulates imagination, and helps people feel happy. London-based agency DBLG subscribes to this practice, and consequently they’re playing with some fun ideas.

One of these projects is called “Bears.” They’re basically reverse engineering computer animation to produce stop-motion animation using 3D printing. It’s a novel concept of dissecting a computer-based animation sequence, producing 3D-printed models of the frames, then using a traditional stop-motion photography process to produce a 3D animation. Brilliant.

If you enjoyed these posts we invite you to read some more on our Tumblr journal.